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Condition of riverine ecosystem health

Key finding

Queensland’s freshwater aquatic ecosystems vary significantly in condition. Some are in good to very good condition while others do not meet standards for water quality.

Queensland

Waterways in Queensland are in widely varying condition. Some rivers are nearly untouched while others have been heavily impacted by historic land uses, development and poor land management practices.

It is important that we protect riverine environments while working to rehabilitate and restore degraded areas.

Healthy Land and Water South East Queensland report card

The Healthy Land and Water South East Queensland Report Card reports on indicators of freshwater health across 18 major catchment areas in South East Queensland (SEQ).

Queensland Government scientists collect data on fish, aquatic macroinvertebrates, ecosystem processes, and water quality indicators. Together these indicators help assess the overall condition of a waterway.

The 2017 report card used the 2015 methodology to calculate environmental grades and impact from sediment entering waterways, extent of habitats such as riparian vegetation and the social and economic benefits of waterways. It also highlighted management actions needed to improve waterways health. While no overall grade of ecosystem health for Moreton Bay was reported, grades were provided for each catchment.

Report card grades for freshwater rivers varied between catchments. Some are in ‘excellent’ or ‘good’ condition while others are ‘poor’ because they have been heavily affected by land use and development.

Historic and current land management practices have caused loss of riparian, or riverbank, vegetation as land has been cleared to make way for agriculture and urban development.

  • Riparian vegetation provides shade for streams, helping regulate temperature to support freshwater habitat.
  • Riparian vegetation filters out pollutants such as nutrients and sediments, preventing them from entering waterways.

More information:

Great Barrier Reef report card

The Great Barrier Reef report cards document progress toward meeting water quality and catchment indicator targets set through the Reef Water Quality Protection Plan from 2009 to 2017 and will subsequently be set through the Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan in 2018. Catchment indicators include changes in the extent and condition of wetlands and riparian vegetation every four years and annual changes in ground cover.

There was a loss of 330ha (less than 0.1%) of natural wetland extent across the Great Barrier Reef catchment between 2009 and 2013. Rates of wetland loss between 2009 and 2013 were lower in most regions than for previous periods.

The 2016 report card added condition (state and pressure) of freshwater wetlands. The state of freshwater wetlands is assessed based on physical integrity, hydrology, connectivity and biotic integrity. The overall state of wetlands was reported as moderate.

Overall loss of vegetated freshwater swamps has continued since 2001, albeit more slowly in most regions. Their extent declined by 59ha (less than 0.1%) between 2009 and 2013 across the Great Barrier Reef catchment. There was a small increase in the rate of loss of vegetated freshwater swamps in the Fitzroy catchment between 2009 and 2013 compared to 2005-2009.

The Fitzroy and Burnett Mary regions had the highest proportional loss of wetlands between 2009 and 2013 (0.1%).

More information:

    Fitzroy Basin report card

    The Fitzroy Basin Report Card reports on the condition of the catchments within the Fitzroy Basin, the largest on the eastern seaboard. Assessed freshwater indicators include physical/chemical, nutrients, toxicants and ecology.

    In the 2015-2016 report card, the Fitzroy Basin’s ecosystem health scored an overall grade of B (‘good’) for the third consecutive year. The Connors, Callide and Mackenzie Rivers received C grades while all other catchments attained B’s.

    For the first time in 6 years, none of the catchments in the Fitzroy Basin received a poor score for toxicants.

    • Physical-chemical results were generally good across the region with notable improvements in the Upper Isaac for turbidity
    • Nutrient results were generally good.
    • Copper and aluminium continue to stand out as toxicants of interest.

    Rainfall totals were very low across most of the basin; subsequently groundcover was also low.

    The index of ecological health of the waterways of the Fitzroy Basin remained stable overall in 2015-2016 compared to 2014-2015.

    Agriculture is the largest land use in the Fitzroy Basin and a major consumer of water assets. A and B grades were awarded across the Fitzroy Basin for cropping and stock water use.

    Waterway condition takes a long time to respond to management practice changes and is also influenced by natural changes such as varying rainfall between years.

    More information:

      Gladstone Harbour report card

      Freshwater ecosystems not analysed in report card publication.

      More information:

      Mackay–Whitsunday report card

      The Mackay–Whitsunday Healthy Rivers to Reef Partnership report card reports on environmental and social indicators, as well as the region’s industry stewardship. The report card provides environmental grades for 5 freshwater basins, 8 estuaries, 5 inshore marine zones and 1 offshore marine zone.

      The 2015 Mackay-Whitsunday Report Card delivered mixed results for local waterways, generally consistent with the previous year report card.

      Some areas improved primarily due to lower rainfall than average (for example, water quality in the Whitsunday region improved from D to B). Contaminants like pesticides are being detected in freshwater streams, particularly the Plane, Sandy, Pioneer and Rocky Dam Creeks, resulting in poor or very poor scores for these areas.

      The 2016 Mackay-Whitsunday Report Card reported environmental condition data from the 2015-2016 period.

      Contaminants like pesticides continue to be an issue in freshwater streams particularly the Plane Creek and Sandy Creek which both received a low grade of E: Pioneer River received D. It should be noted that not all indicators are reported annually and not all areas and basins have data collected.

      More information:

        Wet Tropics report card

        The Wet Tropics Report Card 2017 details the health of the Wet Tropics waterways, including its major rivers, estuaries, inshore and offshore reefs. Its 9 freshwater basins—Daintree, Mossman, Barron, Mulgrave, Russell, Johnstone, Tully, Murray and Herbert—are assessed for water quality, habitat and hydrology, and fish.

        Overall grades vary for the basins, from Daintree’s ‘very good’ to Mossman and Murray gaining ‘moderate’ grades; all other basins are ‘good’.

        Compared to 2014-2015, the Barron improved in overall score and grade due to its higher water quality index score. The improvement in the Tully Basin from ‘moderate’ to ‘good’ was related to the inclusion of the invasive weeds indicator (which rated very good, meaning few weeds) in the 2015-2016 reporting period. Fewer weeds make for a healthier natural habitat.

        There have now been two consecutive reporting years (2014-2015 and 2015-2016) with dry conditions and low discharge across most of the region. These conditions can provide better water quality results for basins due to reduced runoff and erosion and associated sediment, nutrient and pesticide mobilisation compared to wetter years.

        More information:

          Condamine Catchment report card

          The Condamine Catchment Report Card 2013 rated the overall condition of the catchment as ’good’, with most indicators meeting guidelines or benchmark values.

          Water, Land and Wildlife were all ranked as ‘good’, and progress to targets (People) was ranked as ‘fair’.

          More information:

          QCatchment Bulloo

          Conceptual models are used to determine catchment specific condition indicators based on the relevant pressures in the catchment. Key threats identified for the Bulloo catchment were:

          • introduced aquatic fauna
          • deposited sediment
          • introduced riparian vegetation.

          Indicators of ecosystem condition relevant to these threats were assessed where possible.

          Overall the condition of riverine ecosystems in the Bulloo in 2012 was ranked as ‘slightly disturbed’.

          Introduced aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no exotic fish or crayfish found during monitoring.

          Deposited sediment was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no loss of waterhole persistence from sediment deposition (sediment settling to the bottom of waterholes) in the waterholes surveyed.


          Introduced riparian fauna was ranked as ‘slightly disturbed’ with some physical damage to waterhole banks observed from feral pigs and cattle.

          More information:

          QCatchment Paroo

          Conceptual models are used to determine catchment specific condition indicators based on the relevant pressures in the catchment. Key threats identified for the Paroo catchment were:

          • introduced aquatic fauna
          • deposited sediment
          • introduced riparian vegetation.

          Indicators of ecosystem condition relevant to these threats were assessed where possible.

          Overall the condition of riverine ecosystems in the Paroo in 2012 was ranked as ‘moderately disturbed’.

          Introduced aquatic fauna was ranked as in ‘severe’ condition with European carp caught at all assessment sites and goldfish at most assessment sites.

          Deposited sediment was ranked as in ‘good’ condition with no loss of waterhole persistence from sediment deposition (sediment settling to the bottom of waterholes) in waterholes surveyed.

          Introduced riparian fauna was ranked as in ‘slightly disturbed’ condition with some physical damage to waterhole banks observed from feral pigs and cattle.

          More information:

          QCatchment Warrego

          Conceptual models are used to determine catchment specific condition indicators based on the relevant pressures in the catchment. Key threats for the Warrego catchment relevant were:

          • introduced aquatic fauna
          • deposited sediment
          • introduced riparian vegetation.

          Indicators of ecosystem condition relevant to these threats were assessed where possible.

          Overall the condition of riverine ecosystems in the Warrego in 2012 was ranked as ‘moderately disturbed’.

          Introduced aquatic fauna was ranked as in ‘moderate’ condition with high carp biomass (weight) recorded at many sites.

          Deposited sediment was ranked as in ‘moderate’ condition, the persistence of waterholes over time was impacted at two sites by deposited sediment (sediment settling to the bottom of waterholes).


          Introduced riparian fauna was ranked as in ‘slightly disturbed’ condition with some physical damage to water banks from feral pigs and cattle.

          More information:

          QCatchment Nebine

          Conceptual models are used to determine catchment specific indicators based on the relevant pressures in the catchment. Key threats identified for the Nebine catchment were:

          • introduced aquatic fauna
          • deposited sediment
          • introduced riparian vegetation.

          Overall the condition of riverine ecosystems in the Nebine in 2012 was ranked as ‘moderately disturbed’.

          Introduced aquatic fauna was ranked as in ‘moderate’ condition, bordering on ‘severe’ condition, with a high proportion of exotic fish (mostly European carp) caught at most assessment sites.

          Deposited sediment was ranked as in ‘good’ condition with no loss of waterhole persistence from sediment deposition (sediment settling to the bottom of waterholes) in waterholes surveyed.

          Introduced riparian fauna was ranked as in ‘slightly disturbed’ condition with some physical damage to water banks from feral pigs and cattle.

          More information:

          QCatchment Lake Eyre

          Conceptual models are used to determine catchment specific condition indicators based on the relevant pressures in the catchment. Key threats in the Lake Eyre and Bulloo catchments were:

          • introduced riparian fauna
          • introduced aquatic fauna
          • introduced riparian weeds.

          Indicators of ecosystem condition relevant to these threats were assessed where possible.

          No overall condition score was provided for the Lake Eyre and Bulloo Province and no condition indicators were measured for introduced riparian fauna, however both feral pig and cattle damage to waterhole banks and riparian zones was found to be widespread in 2013 with few sites unaffected by these introduced animals.

          Despite the spread of introduced aquatic fauna in the Georgina and Cooper (ranked as ‘slightly disturbed’), the Bulloo and Diamantina were in ‘good’ condition with 100% native species. There is still a diverse and abundant native fish community in place across the province.


          No condition indicators were measured for introduced riparian weeds, however all catchments in the Lake Eyre and Bulloo Province were assessed as being at moderate risk of riparian weed disturbance, based on the types of land use surrounding waterholes.

          More information:

          QCatchment Normanby

          The Normanby catchment is located in the south-east of Cape York.  It is one of the largest east coast river systems in Australia and drains to Princess Charlotte Bay, north-west of Cooktown.

          Field-collected data measuring ecosystem response to identified threats was assessed at 6 Normanby catchment sites.

          Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Normanby catchment was ‘moderate disturbance’.

          Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of cattle and feral pig impacts at sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

          Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘moderate disturbance’, with significant and widespread infestations of lantana, rubbervine and sicklepod weed species at assessment sites.

          Aquatic flora was assessed as being in ‘good’ condition (no introduced aquatic flora infestations at assessment sites).

          Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘minor disturbance’ to condition, with goldfish in the upper east Normanby, and cane toads or their tadpoles at most assessment sites. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.) This area is a high risk for other introductions, including tilapia.

          More information:

            QCatchment Coleman

            The Coleman catchment is on the western coast of Cape York, and includes several river systems including the Coleman and Edward.

            The QCatchments condition of Coleman riverine ecosystems was assessed using field-collected data from 5 sites was used to asses Coleman catchment ecosystem response to identified threats (where possible).

            The QCatchments overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Coleman catchment was ‘minor disturbance’.

            Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed but based on evidence of impacts from pigs and cattle at all sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

            Introduced aquatic flora condition was assessed as being in ‘good’ condition (no infestations at assessment sites).

            Introduced aquatic fauna condition was ranked as ‘good’, with no pest fish species detected at assessment sites. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

            Introduced riparian flora condition was ranked as ‘minor disturbance’, given light infestations of rubbervine and sicklepod at some sites.

            More information:

            QCatchment Endeavour

            The Endeavour catchment is on the eastern coast of Cape York, and includes the Endeavour and Annan river systems. Cooktown is the major urban centre.

            Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed from 4 Endeavour catchment sites.

            Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Endeavour catchment was ‘moderate disturbance’.

            Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of impacts (ranging from severe to almost pristine) at sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

            Riparian flora condition was assessed as having ‘moderate disturbance’ (with various introduced weed species identified at assessment sites, e.g. lantana, rubbervine, sicklepod)

            Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no pest fish species detected at assessment sites. Tilapia have previously been sampled in the Endeavour: confirmation of continued existence would impact condition. Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted at any sites but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

            Aquatic flora was assessed as being in ‘good’ condition (no introduced aquatic flora infestations at assessment sites).

            More information:

              QCatchment Stewart

              The Stewart catchment is located on the east coast of Cape York, and includes the Stewart, Rocky and Massey rivers, and Breakfast Creek.

              Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 2 Stewart catchments sites.

              Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Stewart catchment was ‘good condition’.

              Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of minor impacts at sites (mainly from pigs), there is expected to be little change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

              Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘good condition’, with no infestations of priority weeds evident at the monitoring sites.

              Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good condition’, with no pest fish species identified in this assessment, or in previous surveys.  Cane toad adults were sighted in very high numbers at 1 site. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

              More information:

                QCatchment Holroyd

                The Holroyd catchment is on the west coast of Cape York, and drains into the Gulf of Carpentaria.

                Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 3 Holroyd catchment sites.

                Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Holroyd catchment was ‘minor disturbance’.

                Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of impacts from feral pigs and cattle at all sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                Riparian flora condition was assessed as having ‘minor disturbance’, with low level infestation of sicklepod identified at 2 assessment sites. Threat from weeds was severe.

                Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no pest fish species detected at assessment sites in this assessment, or previous surveys.  Cane toads were sighted and are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                The assessment also identified apparent impacts on water clarity (turbidity) downstream of a road crossing, and noted the role played by groundwater inputs to streams during dry flow conditions (refuge values).

                More information:

                QCatchment Jacky Jacky

                The Jacky Jacky catchment is on the north-east coast of Cape York.  It includes the Jackey Jackey and Harmer creeks, Escape River and numerous smaller coastal streams.

                Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 3 Jacky Jacky catchment sites. An additional site was assessed for water quality.

                Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Jacky Jacky catchment was ‘good condition’. Other than moderate levels of feral pig damage, excellent scores were recorded in all other field measurements.

                Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of feral pig impacts, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘good condition’, with no infestations of priority weed species present at any of the assessment sites.

                Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good condition’ with no previous record of pest fish species, and none detected at sites in this assessment.  Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                More information:

                  QCatchment Jardine

                  The Jardine catchment is the northern-most catchment on the Australian mainland, at the tip of Cape York. It drains in a north-westerly direction into Torres Strait.  The Jardine River is the largest perennial river in Queensland.

                  Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 4 Jardine catchment sites.

                  Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Jardine catchment was ‘good condition’.

                  Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of feral pig impacts at all sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                  Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘good condition’, with no infestations of priority weed species present at any of the assessment sites.

                  Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good condition’ with no pest fish species detected at assessment sites in this assessment, or in previous surveys.  Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                  More information:

                  QCatchment Ducie

                  The Ducie catchment is on the north-west coast of Cape York, and drains to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

                  Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 4 Ducie catchment sites.

                  The QCatchments overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Ducie catchment was ‘good condition’.

                  Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of impacts at sites, some change in instream flora and fauna community structure is expected.

                  Introduced riparian flora condition was assessed as being in ‘good’ condition (no infestations of weed species at assessment sites).

                  Introduced aquatic flora condition was assessed as being in ‘good’ condition (no infestations at assessment sites).

                  Introduced aquatic fauna condition was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no pest fish species detected at assessment sites. Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted at any sites but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                  More information:

                  QCatchment Lockhart

                  The Lockhart catchment is on the east coast of Cape York and includes the Lockhart, Claudie and Nesbit rivers.

                  Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 3 Lockhart River catchment sites.

                  Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Lockhart catchment was ‘good condition’.

                  Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of feral pig impacts at 2 sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                  Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘good condition’, with no infestations of priority weed species present at the assessment sites. Weeds including sicklepod, grader grass, giant rat’s tail grass, pond apple are known to be in the catchment.

                  Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no pest fish species detected in this assessment, or in previous surveys.  A cane toad was sighted at 1 site. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                  More information:

                    QCatchment Olive–Pascoe

                    The Olive-Pascoe catchment is located on the east coast of Cape York, and includes the Olive, Pascoe and Claudie rivers.

                    Field-collected data measuring ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed at 4 Olive Pascoe catchment sites.

                    Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Olive-Pascoe catchment was ‘minor disturbance’.

                    Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of low level cattle and feral pig impacts at some sites, there is expected to be little change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                    Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘minor disturbance’.  Weeds (including rubbervine and sicklepod) were found at light levels of infestation at 3 monitored sites. Current threat of introduced riparian flora to the Olive-Pascoe was assessed as severe, given widespread presence and potential for quick change in condition.

                    Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good condition’, with no pest fish species identified in this assessment, or in previous surveys.  Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                    More information:

                      QCatchment Wenlock

                      The Wenlock catchment is located on the west coast of Cape York, and includes the Wenlock River and various smaller creeks.

                      Field-collected data at 8 sites was used to measure ecosystem response to identified threats (where possible).

                      The QCatchments overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Wenlock catchment was ‘good condition’.

                      While condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed, evidence of minor impacts at sites suggests little change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                      Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘minor disturbance’, due to localised infestations of rubbervine and sicklepod at the monitoring sites, however riparian weeds are the main threat to riverine ecology in the Wenlock.

                      Aquatic flora was assessed as being in ‘good’ condition (no introduced aquatic flora infestations at assessment sites), however there are anecdotal reports of water hyacinth in this catchment, and water lettuce has been identified in adjoining catchments.

                      Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good condition’, with no pest fish species identified in this assessment. Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted at any of the sites but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                      More information:

                      QCatchment Jeannie

                      The Jeannie catchment is on the east coast of Cape York and includes the Jeannie and Starcke river systems.

                      Field-collected data measuring ecosystems responses to identified threats was assessed at 1 Jeannie catchment site.

                      Overall rating of riverine ecosystems in the Jeannie catchment was ‘good condition’.

                      Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. With no evidence of cattle damage and only minor evidence of feral pig impacts, there is expected to be little change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                      Riparian flora was assessed as having ‘good condition’, with no infestations of priority weed species present at the assessment site.

                      Aquatic fauna was ranked as ‘good’ condition with no pest fish species detected in this assessment. Cane toad eggs were found at the site. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                      More information:

                        QCatchment Archer

                        The Archer catchment is on the western coast of Cape York, draining to the Gulf of Carpentaria near Aurukun.

                        Field-collected data measuring riverine ecosystem responses to identified threats was assessed from 4 Archer catchment sites. While the Archer’s riverine ecosystems gained an overall rating of ‘good condition’, introduced riparian flora poses a severe threat, as only 1 of the 4 sites was free of weeds.

                        Condition of river systems associated with introduced riparian fauna was not assessed. Based on evidence of impacts from feral pigs and cattle at all sites, there is expected to be some change in instream flora and fauna community structure.

                        Introduced aquatic fauna condition was ranked as ‘good’, with no pest fish species detected in this assessment, or in any previous surveys.  Cane toads or their tadpoles were not sighted at any sites but are known to occur in the catchment. (The presence of cane toads is not reflected in the condition scores because of their extensive presence across Cape York.)

                        More information:

                        Indicator: Condition of riverine ecosystem health

                        Condition of riverine ecosystem health identified in various water quality report card areas across Queensland.

                        Great Barrier Reef report card

                        Overall grade applies to marine ecosystem health only.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Healthy Land and Water South East Queensland report card

                        Report card does not provide an overall grade.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Fitzroy Basin report card

                        Overall grade applies to freshwater and estuarine ecosystem health only.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Gladstone Harbour report card

                        Freshwater ecosystems not analysed in report card publication.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Mackay–Whitsunday report card

                        Report card does not provide an overall grade.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Condamine Catchment report card

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Warrego

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Wet Tropics report card

                        Report card does not provide an overall grade.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Lake Eyre

                        Report card does not provide an overall grade.

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Coleman

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Endeavour

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Holroyd

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Jacky Jacky

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Jardine

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Jeannie

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Lockhart

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Normanby

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Olive–Pascoe

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Stewart

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        QCatchment Wenlock

                        See also: Freshwater wetland ecosystems assessment summary.

                        Report card grades in Healthy Land and Water South East Queensland report card

                        No data available for this region.

                        Report card grades in Great Barrier Reef report card

                        No data available for this region.

                        Report card grades in Gladstone Harbour report card

                        No data available for this region.

                        Report card grades in Mackay–Whitsunday report card

                        No data available for this region.

                        Report card grades in Wet Tropics report card

                        No data available for this region.

                        Report card grades in QCatchment Lake Eyre

                        No data available for this region.

                        Download data from Queensland Government data

                        Last updated 8 January 2019

                        Assessment summary

                        See an overview of gradings for freshwater wetland ecosystems in the assessment summary.