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Red soil hand shape on sand in Aboriginal art style © iStock.com/stanciuc

Acknowledgement of Country

The Department of Environment and Science acknowledges the Country and people of Queensland’s First Nations. We pay our respect to Elders, past, present and emerging.

We acknowledge the continuous living culture of First Nations Queenslanders—their diverse languages, customs and traditions, knowledges and systems.

We acknowledge the deep relationship, connection and responsibility to land, sea and sky Country as central to identity and culture.

Country is sacred. Everything on the land has meaning and all people are one with it.

First Nations people speak to Country, listen to Country, sing up Country, dance up Country, understand Country and long for Country.

We acknowledge and thank First Nations people for the enduring relationship connecting people, Country and ancestors—an unbreakable bond that safely stewarded and protected the land, waters and sky for thousands of generations.

Statement of commitment

The Department of Environment and Science is committed to becoming a better practice agency that values and respects First Nations communities and translates that commitment to genuine and impactful partnerships. To help guide our journey, in 2020 we have worked with First Nations partners to co-design the Gurra Gurra Framework that sets a blueprint for how we will better protect the rights and interests of First Nations peoples.

In the next State of the Environment Report 2022, Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and Partnerships will give an update on its progress.

We acknowledge the critical role that First Nations people, their knowledge and expertise play in ensuring that we secure a healthy environment for all Queenslanders now and into the future.