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Fragmentation of remnant vegetation

Key Finding

In the most recent 2015–2017 period, the New England Tablelands has experienced the greatest patch density increase (13.4%) and greatest remnant core areas density loss (-2%). The Gulf Plains experienced the greatest increase in the frequency of edges (226), the Brigalow Belt the greatest increase in patches (316) and the Mulga Lands the greatest fragmentation of core areas into smaller core units (400). These examples demonstrate that fragmentation has many guises and they do not necessarily correlate with rates of clearing.

Queensland

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

The rate of remnant vegetation fragmentation, represented as changes in core, edge, and patch remnants across the landscape, was measured using the statewide regional ecosystem mapping time-series (biennial from 1997 to 2017).

The results show that although fragmentation has been increasing across Queensland, there was a notable decline in the rate of fragmentation for the period 2009 – 2011, from its historic peak between 1999 – 2003. From 2011 through to 2017, there has been another gradual increase in fragmentation, though not to the same extent as 1999 – 2003. This trend was not uniform across all bioregions and was generally more prevalent in the Brigalow Belt, Desert Uplands, Einasleigh Uplands, Mitchell Grass Downs, Mulga Lands and New England Tablelands.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the state. The key trends include:

  • Across the state, the rate of patch fragmentation peaked between 1999 and 2001 (9%).
  • The peak period for the rate of edge creation (4.1%) and the break-up of core areas (4.5%) was between 2001 and 2003, though very similar to the 1999 to 2001 period (4.1% and 4.2%).
  • The period between 2009 and 2011 was a period with the slowest rate of core (0.2%), edge (0.4%) and patch creation (0.4%), however there has been a trend of increase from then, with 2013–2015 recording an increase in patches (3.6%) and the most recent 2015–2017 period recording the highest rate of edge (1.6%) and core creation (0.8%).

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across Queensland bioregions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • New England Tablelands (NET) had the greatest increase in patch density (13.4 per 1,000km2).
  • Mulga Lands (MUL) had the greatest increase in both core density (3.5 per 1,000km2) and number of new core areas created (400).
  • Brigalow Belt (BRB) had the greatest number of patches created (316).
  • Gulf Plains (GUP) had the greatest number of edges created (226).

More information:

Brigalow Belt

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Brigalow Belt Bioregion (BRB). The key trends include:

  • The peak period for fragmentation in the BRB was between 1999 and 2001 (16% for patches, 3.1% for edges, and 4% for core).
  • The 2007 to 2013 period had comparatively low rates of fragmentation, with the lowest rate of patch (0.5%) and edge (0.1%) creation occurring in 2009–2011.
  • There has been a slight trend of increased patch and edge creation since 2013, with the highest rate occurring in the most recent 2015–2017 period (2.2% for patches and 0.5% for edges).

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • Most BRB sub-regions have experienced some level of fragmentation.
  • Narrandool had the greatest increase in the density of patches (88.4 per 1,000km2), edges (233.6 per 1,000km2) and core areas (285.5 per 1,000km2) compared to any other sub-region. This sub-region is relatively small in Queensland compared to others, but the magnitude of change in terms of density was significant.
  • Belyando Downs had the highest frequency of core (54) and edge creation (35) and the second highest number of patches created (25).
  • Isaac–Comet Downs had the highest number of patches created (26).
  • Moonie R.–Commoron Creek Floodout had the greatest loss in the number of core areas (-38), which means that 38 core areas were either removed completely, or converted to patches.
  • Beucazon Hills had no change in the frequency of patch, edge and core values.

More information:

Cape York Peninsula

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Cape York Peninsula Bioregion (CYP). The key trends include:

  • Cape York Peninsula (CYP) has experienced relatively consistent edge creation, peaking in 2003–2005 (9.8%) with the lowest level being in 2011–2013 (2.2%).
  • The percent increase in the number of patches created was also relatively consistent, peaking in 1999–2001 (7.2%) with the lowest percent increase occurring in 2015–2017 (1.5%).
  • For such a relatively intact bioregion, that main characteristic of fragmentation is the exposure and break up of large tracts of vegetation, exposing more edges.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • Change over the 2015–2017 period is consistent with the historical trend of edge fragmentation being introduced into large core areas.
  • The Weipa Plateau sub-region had the highest overall number of edges (25) and core areas (8) created in the bioregion.
  • 3 patches were created across the bioregion during this period.

More information:

Central Queensland Coast

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Central Queensland Coast Bioregion (CQC). The key trends include:

  • There has been a consistent trend of patch creation in the CQC across all years, with only 2009–2011 and 2013–2015 periods dropping below a 1% increase.
  • From 2011 onwards, the rate of increase in edge and core areas has remained relatively flat, however patch creation has remained on an upward trend.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • Proserpine–Sarina Lowlands had the highest patch density (14.7 per 1,000km2) and number of patches created (21).
  • Debella had the highest density of edges created (6.2 per 1,000km2).
  • Clarke–Connors Ranges had the greatest increase in the number of edge (5) and core (6) areas, with a significant number of patches created — second overall in the sub-region (18).

More information:

Channel Country

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Channel Country Bioregion (CHC). The key trends include:

  • The peak period for the rate of patch creation in the CHC was 2005–2007 (116.7%).
  • The 2009–2011 period had the highest rate of core areas created (46.8%).
  • Since 2011 there has been comparatively minimal percentage change in all fragmentation classes across CHC.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • 8 out of the 13 CHC sub-regions experienced no change in fragmentation across core, edge and patch classes from the previous period.
  • 2 patches and 1 core area were created across the bioregion.
  • Goneaway Tablelands was the only sub-region to experience an increase in the density of core and patch areas, though the actual frequency of change recorded was only 1 and 2 respectively.
  • Goneaway Tablelands also had the highest number of edges created (8).
  • Noccundra Slopes sub-region had the highest edge density increase (0.2 edges per 1,000km2).

More information:

Desert Uplands

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Desert Uplands Bioregion (DEU). The key trends include:

  • The 1999–2001 period recorded the largest incidence of patch (70%), edge (15.2%) and core fragmentation (22.9%).
  • Following 2001, the rate of fragmentation has steadily declined to a relatively low rate of increase for patches (0.1%), edges (0.5%) and core (less than 0.1%) up until 2007–2009.
  • The rate of fragmentation in DEU has increased slightly since 2013–2015.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • In the 2015–2017 period, the Jericho sub-region experienced both the greatest density and number of fragmentation classes across all sub-regions (18 patches, 50 edges and 68 core areas).
  • The number of edges recorded across all other sub-regions ranged from 10 to 32, and for core from 16 to 36. This implies larger core area fragmentation is occurring across the bioregion.

More information:

Einasleigh Uplands

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Einasleigh Uplands Bioregion (EIU). The key trends include:

  • The EIU experienced the largest increase in the rate of patch fragmentation for the periods 1997–1999 (15.8%) and 1999–2001 (12.7%).
  • From 2001, there was a decline in fragmentation rates, with the period between 2007 and 2013 seeing patch and core increases of below 1%.
  • There has been slight increase in fragmentation for the 2013 to 2017 period, compared to 2007–2013, with an increase in patch creation (4.1% in 2013–2015), increase in the number of edges ( 2.5% in 2015–2017) and increase in core areas (2% in 2015–2017).

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • The greatest number and density of edges occurred in the Georgetown–Croydon sub-region with 25 created.
  • The Undara–Toomba Basalts sub-region experienced the highest fragmentation of core areas with 14 created.
  • Across most sub-regions, there was an increase in edges of 8 or more, except for the Herberton–Wairuna sub-region.

More information:

Gulf Plains

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Gulf Plains Bioregion (GUP). The key trends include:

  • The rate of patch creation in the GUP has increased significantly in both 2013–2015 (95.9%) and 2015–2017 (25.5%), for which no comparable rate existed prior to 1997–1999 (34.1%).
  • Comparatively minor fragmentation rates occurred between 2005 to 2013.
  • Both the 2013–2015 and 2015–2017 periods, saw the greatest increase in the rate of core areas created for all reporting periods (20.5% and 15.4% respectively).
  • Over most reporting years, excluding 2001–2003 and the period from 2005 to 2013, edge creation has been above 5%.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • For the 2015–2017 period, the Donors Plateau sub-region experienced the greatest increase of patches and edges, both in terms of density (0.5 patches per 1,000km2 and 4.2 edges per 1,000km2) and number (13 patches and 100 edges).
  • Holroyd Plain–Red Plateau sub-region had the greatest increase in core area density (1.5 per 1,000km2).
  • Mitchell–Gilbert Fans had the highest overall increase in the number of core areas (51).
  • Several sub-regions experienced little to no fragmentation increase including — Karumba Plains, Armraynald Plains, Doomadgee Plains, Gilberton Plateau, and Wellesley Islands.

More information:

Mitchell Grass Downs

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Mitchell Grasss Downs Bioregion (MGD). The key trends include:

  • Fragmentation in the MGD peaked during the 1999–2001 period including the creation of patches (49.7%), edges (14.8%) and core areas (16.7%).
  • There was a steady decline across all fragmentation classes until the 2009–2013 period.
  • From 2013, there has been an upward trend in fragmentation.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • For the 2015–2017 period, Flinders sub-region experienced the greatest density of increase across fragmentation classes (4.3 patches per 1,000km2, 13.6 edges per 1,000km2, 5.1 core areas per 1,000km2).
  • Southern Wooded Downs sub-region had the greatest increase in both the number of patches (31) and core areas (69).
  • The Georgina Limestone sub-region and Barkly Tableland experienced no change.

More information:

Mulga Lands

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Mulga Lands Bioregion (MUL). The key trends include:

  • Fragmentation in the MUL bioregion peaked across all classes in the 2001–2003 period (56.7% increase in patches, 21.3% increase in edges and 24.9% increase in the number of core areas), with significant rates of patch creation occurring from 1997 through to 2005.
  • Fragmentation declined to historic lows in the period 2009–2011 (0.6% increase in patches, 0.2% increase in edges and 0.4% increase in core areas) and has been rising slightly in recent years.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • Most sub-regions experienced some level of fragmentation over the 2015–2017 period.
  • The North Eastern Plains sub-region had the greatest increase in patch density (10.4 per 1,000km2), edge density (25.3 per 1,000km2) and core density (30.1 per 1,000km2).
  • The Urisino Sandplains sub-region experienced the greatest number (188) of core areas created.
  • The West Balonne Plains sub-region experienced the greatest number (34) of patches created. The West Warrego sub-region had the greatest number of edges created overall (65).

More information:

New England Tableland

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the New England Tablelands Bioregion (NET). The key trends include:

  • The NET experienced a peak in the rate of patch creation in the 1997–1999 period (4.6%), with the rate also being high in the 1999–2001 period (4%).
  • There was a steep decline in fragmentation from 2001 through to 2009, culminating in a hiatus during the 2009–2011 period.
  • The rate of patch creation has increased substantially since the 2009–2011 period (1.7% for 2011–2013, 2.3% for 2013–2015 and 4% for 2015–2017).
  • The rate of core fragmentation has remained flat since 1999, however there has been a trend of core loss since the 2011–2013 period and a record increase in the number of edges in 2013–2015 (0.6%).

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • The Nandewar Northern Complex sub-region experienced the greatest increase in patch density (16.9 per 1,000km2) and patch count (32), as well as a decline in the number and density of edges and core areas.
  • Stanthorpe Plateau sub-region has had a comparatively minor increase in fragmentation with 3 patches, 4 edges and 1 core area created.
  • Tenterfield Plateau sub-region had no change over the 2015–2017 period.

More information:

Northwest Highlands

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the North-West Highlands Bioregion (NWH). The key trends include:

  • The peak period for fragmentation in NWH occurred in 1997–1999 for all classes (128.6% patch, 17.9% edge, and 33.3% core area increase).
  • From 1999 onwards the rate of fragmentation has been steady, characterised by slight increases in edge effects and the break up of larger core areas.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • Fragmentation has been confined to the Mount Isa Inlier sub-region, with 15 edges and 4 core areas created.
  • No other sub-regions experienced fragmentation over the reporting period.

More information:

Southeast Queensland

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Southeast Queensland Bioregion (SEQ). The key trends include:

  • The rate of fragmentation in SEQ, measured as increases in the frequency of edges and patches, has been steadily above 1% for all bar the 2009–2011 and 2015–2017 period.
  • The 2011 to 2015 period saw the highest increase in patch creation, with rates of 3.5% and 5.9% respectfully. This reduced to 0.3% in 2015–2017, amounting to 76 patches created across the bioregion.

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • 2 patches were created within the Woodenbong sub-region. The reported patch density increase of 509.7 per 1,000km2, however this has been over inflated by the artificially small size of this sub-region, which straddles the Queensland/NSW border.
  • Core areas were removed across several sub-regions. Biggest losses were in Burringbar–Conondale Ranges (20), Sunshine Coast–Gold Coast Lowlands (14) and Gympie Block sub-region (19).
  • The Burnett–Curtis Hills and Ranges sub-region saw the greatest number of patches (19) and edges (30) created.
  • Great Sandy sub-region and the Southern Great Barrier Reef sub-region were the exceptions, seeing no change over the period.

More information:

Wet Tropics

Landscape fragmentation ‘breaks up’ large areas of intact native vegetation, reducing ecological connectivity — the critical connection between ecosystems and habitats that allows wildlife to cross the landscape in search of food, shelter and suitable breeding sites. The opening up of surrounding areas can impact species survival through predation, exposure and decreased food availability.

For the period from 1997 to 2017, the percent change in patch, edge, and core areas was examined for overall trends in the rate of fragmentation across the Wet Tropics Bioregion (WET). The key trends include:

  • The period from 1999–2001 saw the greatest loss of core areas (-0.5%) and associated edges (-0.6%).
  • The period 2005–2007 saw the greatest percentage increase in patches (1.2%) and core areas (0.9%).

For the most recent 2015–2017 reporting period, density and frequency change was examined across sub-regions to determine where fragmentation was most prevalent. It was found that:

  • The Tully sub-region saw the greatest increase in patch density (8.9 per 1,000km2) and number of patches (5). Tully also had the largest increase in core density (16.7 per 1,000km2).
  • The Herbert sub-region saw declines across all fragmentation classes (-2 patches, -1 edge and -6 core areas).
  • The Macalister sub-region experienced an increase in both core and edge density (4.4 per 1,000km2 for both).

More information:

Relevant Sustainable Development Goals’ targets

  • GOAL 15: LIFE ON LAND

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19995.57031.78681.8265
1999 to 20018.99644.11124.2197
2001 to 20035.96424.11554.4645
2003 to 20054.50882.44442.6984
2005 to 20073.13492.62902.1298
2007 to 20091.21270.79240.3274
2009 to 20110.38440.43000.2314
2011 to 20131.95560.55990.3442
2013 to 20153.61111.14200.6532
2015 to 20171.41511.15390.7587

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² by region, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
BioregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Brigalow Belt2.522.412.45
Channel Country0.010.090.00
Central Queensland Coast4.901.631.39
Cape York Peninsula0.030.480.09
Desert Uplands0.412.352.68
Einasleigh Uplands0.050.690.26
Gulf Plains0.171.050.53
Mitchell Grass Downs0.270.580.60
Mulga Lands1.351.853.46
New England Tableland13.36-0.28-2.05
Northwest Highlands0.000.210.05
Southeast Queensland3.811.58-0.11
Wet Tropics0.30-0.080.49

Change in the number of fragmentation classes by region, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
BioregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Brigalow Belt316201101
Channel Country2201
Central Queensland Coast47119
Cape York Peninsula35811
Desert Uplands20121139
Einasleigh Uplands67729
Gulf Plains37226113
Mitchell Grass Downs60128133
Mulga Lands163197400
New England Tableland35-7-16
Northwest Highlands0154
Southeast Queensland7624-25
Wet Tropics4-27

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Brigalow Belt

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 199911.791.051.57
1999 to 200115.973.073.97
2001 to 20035.882.362.07
2003 to 20053.921.281.45
2005 to 20072.891.611.26
2007 to 20090.950.160.12
2009 to 20110.540.100.13
2011 to 20130.630.290.20
2013 to 20151.270.240.23
2015 to 20172.160.540.16

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Brigalow Belt, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Anakie Inlier3.9411.9610.45
Arcadia2.58-1.44-1.84
Banana–Auburn Ranges5.443.294.62
Barakula0.790.770.29
Basalt Downs0.742.300.64
Belyando Downs9.7817.7628.81
Beucazon Hills0.000.010.01
Bogie River Hills0.980.690.82
Boomer Range-1.03-3.040.17
Buckland Basalts0.810.440.85
Callide Creek Downs11.595.924.60
Cape River Hills0.000.340.65
Carnarvon Ranges1.190.510.33
Claude River Downs0.064.075.92
Culgoa–Bokhara-4.78-3.00-0.62
Dawson River Downs4.061.66-8.62
Dulacca Downs-1.6218.1612.81
Eastern Darling Downs9.936.454.49
Inglewood Sandstones1.302.551.82
Isaac–Comet Downs5.544.947.37
Macintyre–Weir Fan27.43-6.709.60
Marlborough Plains2.140.743.28
Moonie–Barwon Interfluve32.565.0416.16
Moonie R.–Commoron Creek Floodout12.515.97-29.38
Mount Morgan Ranges5.155.282.80
Narrandool88.39233.63285.46
Nebo–Connors Ranges0.443.531.47
Northern Bowen Basin2.240.971.95
South Drummond Basin3.70-2.186.03
Southern Downs1.923.693.16
Tara Downs41.1733.3648.31
Taroom Downs4.09-3.40-4.42
Townsville Plains0.450.910.75
Upper Belyando Floodout4.9322.4413.38
Warrambool–Moonie21.1620.1825.35
Weribone High7.972.896.67
Woorabinda0.60-0.14-0.32
Wyarra Hills-0.85-0.55-0.56

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Brigalow Belt, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Anakie Inlier92722
Arcadia9-6-8
Banana–Auburn Ranges2356
Barakula53-1
Basalt Downs38-3
Belyando Downs253554
Beucazon Hills000
Bogie River Hills856
Boomer Range-1-30
Buckland Basalts212
Callide Creek Downs310
Cape River Hills024
Carnarvon Ranges2263
Claude River Downs-11826
Culgoa–Bokhara-8-7-7
Dawson River Downs30-11
Dulacca Downs-131
Eastern Darling Downs208-3
Inglewood Sandstones91711
Isaac–Comet Downs261311
Macintyre–Weir Fan6-10-22
Marlborough Plains12115
Moonie–Barwon Interfluve16-8-9
Moonie R.–Commoron Creek Floodout123-38
Mount Morgan Ranges20197
Narrandool4911
Nebo–Connors Ranges193
Northern Bowen Basin1639
South Drummond Basin13-1613
Southern Downs15292
Tara Downs51-3
Taroom Downs1-3-5
Townsville Plains243
Upper Belyando Floodout316-3
Warrambool–Moonie1794
Weribone High1725
Woorabinda3-1-2
Wyarra Hills-3-2-2

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Channel Country

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19990.006.850.00
1999 to 200150.008.755.88
2001 to 2003100.0010.1913.33
2003 to 20050.0010.468.82
2005 to 2007116.6710.1333.33
2007 to 20090.005.005.41
2009 to 201111.545.7146.79
2011 to 20133.455.59-0.44
2013 to 20153.334.440.88
2015 to 20176.453.270.43

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Channel Country, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Bulloo0.000.000.00
Bulloo Dunefields0.000.090.00
Coongie0.000.000.00
Cooper–Diamantina Plains0.000.090.00
Dieri0.000.000.00
Georgina–Eyre Plains0.000.000.00
Goneaway Tableland0.040.160.02
Lake Pure0.000.000.00
Noccundra Slopes0.000.170.00
Simpson Desert0.000.000.00
Strzelecki Desert0.000.000.00
Sturt Stony Desert0.000.090.00
Toko Plains0.000.000.00

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Channel Country, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Bulloo000
Bulloo Dunefields010
Coongie000
Cooper–Diamantina Plains030
Dieri000
Georgina–Eyre Plains000
Goneaway Tableland281
Lake Pure000
Noccundra Slopes030
Simpson Desert000
Strzelecki Desert000
Sturt Stony Desert050
Toko Plains000

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Central Queensland Coast

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19992.660.750.56
1999 to 20017.551.800.40
2001 to 20032.410.470.16
2003 to 20054.922.930.13
2005 to 20073.561.591.08
2007 to 20093.441.020.68
2009 to 20110.370.120.03
2011 to 20131.660.12-0.10
2013 to 20150.54-0.360.29
2015 to 20172.820.330.29

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Central Queensland Coast, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Byfield-0.840.010.01
Clarke–Connors Ranges3.451.391.37
Debella11.556.20-3.02
Manifold1.60-3.083.28
Proserpine–Sarina Lowlands14.684.414.64
Whitsunday2.441.25-1.18

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Central Queensland Coast, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Byfield-100
Clarke–Connors Ranges1856
Debella63-2
Manifold1-22
Proserpine–Sarina Lowlands2144
Whitsunday21-1

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Cape York Peninsula

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19993.405.761.32
1999 to 20017.246.072.50
2001 to 20033.073.520.74
2003 to 20054.769.770.74
2005 to 20074.559.031.57
2007 to 20090.007.100.51
2009 to 20112.724.971.53
2011 to 20133.172.210.40
2013 to 20152.052.990.20
2015 to 20171.515.801.10

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Cape York Peninsula, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Battle Camp Sandstones0.000.000.00
Cape York–Torres Strait0.000.930.00
Coastal Plains0.000.000.00
Coen–Yambo Inlier0.040.650.00
Jardine–Pascoe Sandstones0.070.000.00
Laura Lowlands0.000.560.06
Northern Holroyd Plain0.000.160.00
Starke Coastal Lowlands0.200.610.41
Weipa Plateau0.000.900.29

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Cape York Peninsula, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Battle Camp Sandstones000
Cape York–Torres Strait010
Coastal Plains000
Coen–Yambo Inlier1150
Jardine–Pascoe Sandstones100
Laura Lowlands0101
Northern Holroyd Plain040
Starke Coastal Lowlands132
Weipa Plateau0258

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Desert Uplands

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 199934.2711.1817.61
1999 to 200169.9715.1922.86
2001 to 200325.275.4014.45
2003 to 20057.903.208.07
2005 to 20072.752.834.57
2007 to 20090.130.490.03
2009 to 20110.760.870.41
2011 to 20130.250.450.47
2013 to 20151.010.891.11
2015 to 20172.493.824.25

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Desert Uplands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Alice Tableland-0.031.160.65
Cape–Campaspe Plains0.251.292.39
Jericho2.737.6810.46
Prairie–Torrens Creeks Alluvials0.102.502.77

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Desert Uplands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Alice Tableland-12916
Cape–Campaspe Plains21019
Jericho185068
Prairie–Torrens Creeks Alluvials13236

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Einasleigh Uplands

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 199915.813.872.70
1999 to 200112.705.523.87
2001 to 20031.692.470.30
2003 to 20051.394.292.30
2005 to 20074.103.513.05
2007 to 2009-0.261.610.49
2009 to 20110.791.790.07
2011 to 20130.780.600.14
2013 to 20154.151.150.49
2015 to 20171.492.512.02

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Einasleigh Uplands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Broken River0.030.45-0.03
Georgetown–Croydon0.102.410.19
Herberton–Wairuna0.320.40-0.28
Hodgkinson Basin0.090.600.33
Kidston0.000.380.41
Undara–Toomba Basalts0.050.840.68

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Einasleigh Uplands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Broken River114-1
Georgetown–Croydon1252
Herberton–Wairuna22-2
Hodgkinson Basin184
Kidston01112
Undara–Toomba Basalts11714

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Gulf Plains

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 199934.1514.068.22
1999 to 20011.8217.539.54
2001 to 20035.364.762.18
2003 to 200511.8614.6514.53
2005 to 20070.003.690.68
2007 to 20093.031.910.50
2009 to 20115.882.980.50
2011 to 20132.781.411.50
2013 to 201595.958.2420.49
2015 to 201725.5217.0315.37

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Gulf Plains, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Armraynald Plains0.000.060.00
Claraville Plains0.050.300.03
Donors Plateau0.554.240.99
Doomadgee Plains0.000.060.00
Gilberton Plateau0.000.210.00
Holroyd Plain–Red Plateau0.411.981.47
Karumba Plains0.000.000.00
Mitchell–Gilbert Fans0.220.590.99
Wellesley Islands0.000.000.00
Woondoola Plains0.081.570.25

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Gulf Plains, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Armraynald Plains010
Claraville Plains2111
Donors Plateau1310023
Doomadgee Plains010
Gilberton Plateau030
Holroyd Plain–Red Plateau94332
Karumba Plains000
Mitchell–Gilbert Fans113051
Wellesley Islands000
Woondoola Plains2376

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Mitchell Grass Downs

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 199913.583.338.78
1999 to 200149.6914.7616.70
2001 to 20039.373.297.14
2003 to 20057.684.226.00
2005 to 20073.983.553.17
2007 to 20091.121.370.44
2009 to 20111.001.140.85
2011 to 20130.330.400.30
2013 to 20155.272.632.97
2015 to 20176.262.913.49

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Mitchell Grass Downs, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Barkly Tableland0.000.000.00
Central Downs0.120.100.36
Flinders4.3313.595.12
Georgina Limestone0.000.000.00
Kynuna Plateau0.000.750.18
Southern Wooded Downs0.951.412.19
Southwestern Downs0.000.140.16

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Mitchell Grass Downs, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Barkly Tableland000
Central Downs11933
Flinders185621
Georgina Limestone000
Kynuna Plateau0174
Southern Wooded Downs314169
Southwestern Downs056

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Mulga Lands

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 199920.503.062.12
1999 to 200153.999.9010.25
2001 to 200356.6821.3324.92
2003 to 200529.965.8911.02
2005 to 200710.877.847.64
2007 to 20091.541.021.31
2009 to 20110.630.250.38
2011 to 20131.381.181.20
2013 to 20152.702.171.55
2015 to 20172.951.432.18

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Mulga Lands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Cuttaburra–Paroo-0.160.057.22
Eastern Mulga Plains8.367.256.84
Langlo Plains4.624.9411.42
Nebine Plains0.911.902.89
North Eastern Plains10.4325.2630.07
Northern Uplands0.650.48-0.26
Urisino Sandplains0.542.7023.28
Warrego Plains0.110.550.70
West Balonne Plains10.193.974.14
West Bulloo0.610.780.83
West Warrego0.781.841.45

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Mulga Lands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Cuttaburra–Paroo-1044
Eastern Mulga Plains3214-7
Langlo Plains241351
Nebine Plains5814
North Eastern Plains103631
Northern Uplands75-3
Urisino Sandplains420188
Warrego Plains21013
West Balonne Plains345-5
West Bulloo172123
West Warrego296551

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in New England Tableland

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19994.630.410.38
1999 to 20014.04-0.180.03
2001 to 20031.750.050.08
2003 to 20051.600.140.13
2005 to 20071.210.32-0.11
2007 to 20090.480.00-0.11
2009 to 2011-0.120.180.14
2011 to 20131.670.05-0.94
2013 to 20152.340.64-0.35
2015 to 20174.01-0.32-0.44

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in New England Tableland, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Nandewar Northern Complex16.94-2.51-3.36
Stanthorpe Plateau4.316.092.34
Tenterfield Plateau0.000.000.00

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in New England Tableland, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Nandewar Northern Complex32-11-17
Stanthorpe Plateau341
Tenterfield Plateau000

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Northwest Highlands

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 1999128.5717.8633.33
1999 to 200118.755.307.35
2001 to 200321.056.4713.70
2003 to 2005-8.7012.162.41
2005 to 20070.006.020.00
2007 to 20099.52-1.70-4.71
2009 to 20114.350.00-2.47
2011 to 2013-4.174.6212.66
2013 to 20150.008.29-2.25
2015 to 20170.007.654.60

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Northwest Highlands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
McArthur0.000.000.00
Mount Isa Inlier0.000.330.09
Southwestern Plateaus & Floodouts0.000.000.00
Thorntonia0.000.000.00

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Northwest Highlands, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
McArthur000
Mount Isa Inlier0154
Southwestern Plateaus & Floodouts000
Thorntonia000

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Southeast Queensland

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19992.140.820.60
1999 to 20012.060.89-0.03
2001 to 20031.450.310.01
2003 to 20051.391.34-0.10
2005 to 20071.971.280.19
2007 to 20091.411.650.15
2009 to 20110.130.25-0.08
2011 to 20133.470.740.36
2013 to 20155.861.880.38
2015 to 20170.310.15-0.13

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Southeast Queensland, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Brisbane–Barambah Volcanics1.783.725.95
Burnett–Curtis Coastal Lowlands1.503.675.14
Burnett–Curtis Hills and Ranges3.224.990.04
Burringbar–Conondale Ranges6.13-4.21-6.77
Great Sandy0.000.000.00
Gympie Block3.561.17-1.42
Moreton Basin14.723.624.47
Scenic Rim0.62-1.41-1.40
South Burnett2.630.51-0.91
Southern Great Barrier Reef0.000.000.00
Sunshine Coast–Gold Coast Lowlands16.59-3.79-9.02
Woodenbong509.7334.1764.92

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Southeast Queensland, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Brisbane–Barambah Volcanics3813
Burnett–Curtis Coastal Lowlands1913
Burnett–Curtis Hills and Ranges1930-2
Burringbar–Conondale Ranges8-14-20
Great Sandy000
Gympie Block91-9
Moreton Basin1600
Scenic Rim1-2-2
South Burnett1-1-4
Southern Great Barrier Reef000
Sunshine Coast–Gold Coast Lowlands16-7-14
Woodenbong200

Percent change in the number of fragmentation classes from previous reporting period in Wet Tropics

  • Chart
  • Table
YearPatch value (%)Edge value (%)Core value (%)
1997 to 19990.980.12-0.06
1999 to 20011.09-0.56-0.47
2001 to 20030.430.260.53
2003 to 20050.130.12-0.03
2005 to 20071.180.220.93
2007 to 20090.400.030.00
2009 to 20110.480.580.03
2011 to 20130.24-0.07-0.28
2013 to 20150.720.200.15
2015 to 20170.09-0.030.22

Density change of fragmentation classes per 1000km² in Wet Tropics, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count)Edge value (Count)Core value (Count)
Atherton0.13-1.000.09
Bellenden Ker–Lamb0.00-0.790.00
Daintree–Bloomfield0.310.31-0.29
Herbert-1.40-0.50-5.30
Innisfail-2.280.25-1.12
Kirrama–Hinchinbrook0.00-1.440.72
Macalister1.144.424.39
Paluma–Seaview0.440.44-0.43
Tully8.880.7816.69

Change in the number of fragmentation classes in Wet Tropics, 2015 to 2017

  • Chart
  • Table
SubregionPatch value (Count per 1000km²)Edge value (Count per 1000km²)Core value (Count per 1000km²)
Atherton0-10
Bellenden Ker–Lamb0-20
Daintree–Bloomfield11-1
Herbert-2-1-6
Innisfail-20-1
Kirrama–Hinchinbrook0-42
Macalister144
Paluma–Seaview11-1
Tully5010

Download data from Queensland Government data

Metadata

The statistics are derived from a landscape fragmentation analysis of the Queensland regional ecosystem remnant cover time-series (1997 to 2017) for each bioregion and sub-region. The analysis is similar to the Landscape Fragmentation and Connectivity (LFC) Tool developed to test for Significant Residual Impact on Connectivity Areas under the Environmental Offsets Framework.